Twitter Canada, Traditional Media, and more…

Hello all!  I have decided to add something to this blog: my summary of the morning’s marketing news that comes across my desk.  I will aim to have this published every weekday around noon.

If you have any suggested sources, please forward them to me.  I am always interested in new information.

Onwards!

Twitter Canada Open for Business 

The ubiquitous 140-character text broadcast service had opened its Canadian outpost.  It seems like their focus is on business; the article mentions several tools such as Twitter Amplify and Ad Targeting.

Amplify is video service that sends “real-time” video embedded in a tweet, and the Canadian office managing director says it will be useful for radio broadcasters.  I have no clue how it will manage to be “real-time”, but the concept is interesting.

Ad Targeting Isn’t quite what it sounds like.  It is a method of engaging people who have just watched a traditional television advertisement to create a community around a show or advertisement.

Both tools seem designed to enhance interaction with traditional media.  It is worth noting that the managing director, Kristine Stewart, used to work as the executive vice president of English Services at CBC – in fact she only changed jobs in April.  It is good to see a veteran broadcaster heading services designed to enhance traditional media, especially in an age when radio revenue is stagnant and television profits are plummeting.

Traditions

As just noted, traditional media is suffering.  Marshall McLuhan’s line between hot and cold media is beginning to blur.  The drop in television profit, according to the story linked above, is a decline in advertising sales.  Television has been hot media in the past, but YouTube’s on-demand entertainment is much more convenient than waiting for your favourite show to come on – and there space for advertisement.

Apparently radio advertising sales have increased, despite Canadian radio’s bottom line immobile.  News and newstalk stations are staying profitable because listeners are paying attention (beautiful words to any advertiser).  Ontario radio stations are the most profitable in the country – not surprising if you know what the 401 highway in Toronto is like.  Radio’s lower entry price than television and use as background ambiance in small businesses are also contributing factors to the medium’s continued success.

One interesting side note from the linked radio story: CBC alone employs about the same number of people as private broadcasters CTV, Global Television, City and Quebec’s TVA combined.

Why is Traditional Still Alive?

It isn’t surprising that marketers are sticking with what they know – and what is simple.  This infographic says it right: trying to keep up with the data provided by social media is like “trying to drink from a fire hose”.  Personally, I like my water in glasses; it’s much more manageable.

Media like radio are much easier to define.  A station will broadcast specific content that will (with some exceptions) attract a specific audience.  Television is the same.  When it comes to awareness campaigns based on advertising, a reliable audience is key.

However, that doesn’t mean that all new/digital media are hard to use.  Google has been busy beating the hell out of other advertisers when it comes to mobile ads.  That isn’t surprising: Google’s simple but effective keyword based advertising platform combined with their integrated services (Gmail, YouTube, search, etc) makes it easy to get the right message to the right person.

So…Why Should I Care?

Media literacy.  Having a perspective on the media landscape is important so that you – the consumer of media or a business owner using media – can make decisions about what is right for you.  Whether you are watching or creating the commercial, a little knowledge can go a long way.

Great Reads

What is the most important job skill of the future?  The ability to interact face-to-face.  

The press is tired of bad press releases.  Give them a break and get the coverage you want by reading (and memorizing) this style guide.

Foxy Foxy

I’ll leave you with an introduction to the head of Twitter Canada.  Other than working for one of my favourite broadcast companies (support public broadcasting!), the managing director is also a foxy lady.

kristine stewart Twitter canada managing director
Gaze into the eyes of Twitter Canada…

The Wrap

Did I miss something?  Is my sentence structure awful?  Send me an email: russell@rggraham.me.

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