Marketing Monday

Happy Monday, everyone!  Last week, I tried an experiment; writing a blog every morning.  It was a great experiment, but I am not convinced that I should continue.  As such, I am trying a twice-a-week schedule: a Monday-morning catch up on news from the Marketing industry and something else on Friday which will likely depend on the events of each week.  Stay tuned!

Onwards!

Instagram Video

Facebook has added video to Instagram.  Yup, it’s happening.  Twitter’s app, Vine, has propelled the other social media giant to create a competitor.

Instagram’s co-founder, Kevin Systrom, may have said it best:

“This is the same Instagram we all know and love but it moves,”

The Instagram feature allows for 15 seconds of video, and includes the filters that Instragram is so well loved for.

I like the upgrade to 15 seconds.  Vine seemed like a cool idea, but 6 seconds is very limiting.  15 is the same length as a short commercial on radio, so marketers and advertisers will be able to adapt quickly.

Details Count  

Mountain Equipment Co-op has changed its logo.  Scary stuff.

Apparently the change is due to a change in customer demographics.  Though there was one comment, by Mountain Man, attached to the story on Marketin Mag’s website that made this point:

From iconic to unremarkable.

Personally, I don’t know how well the change will go over.  The new logo reminds me of GAP’s logo, though the transparent elements of it  could be perceived in a variety of ways.  Only time will tell.

Ogilvy & Mathers Does it Again  

The marketing giant’s New York office has created an equally gigantic campaign for Coca-Cola.  At the least, I must give them points for creativity and ambition.  You’ll see what I mean:

The scope of the campaign is incredible.  I’m impressed that they managed to pull it off.

A Canadian Icon Takes Back Ground  

Canadian Tire sells more than just tires, and they’re more than happy to show it.  Ottawa’s Scotiabank Place is going to become Canadian Tire Centre.

Oh, and Canadian Tire is taking over almost everything at the arena.  Sport Chek will be supplying the hockey team, Mark’s work Warehouse (now just Mark’s) will supply staff clothing, the kitchens will become the company’s personal test kitchen, and even the in-area bar will be rebranded as the Sport Chek Bar & Grill.

All of those subsidiaries are relatively recent acquisitions for the Canadian company.  I have heard that Canadian companies are not aggressive enough in how they do business, at least compared to their American counterparts.  This kind of wide-ranging deal is a strong move for a Canadian company, and hopefully the start of a reversed trend.

Online Ads Pass Traditional Media

Online advertising is taking over the media buying landscape and providing solid profits.  This is no surprise to most of us.  The online environment allows for more targeting, more tracking, and generally better spend ad dollars.

Thought there is one surprise that I touched on last week: radio advertising spend is on the rise, which is likely due to radios ubiquity, low entrance price, and availability of “hot” stations.  By “hot” I mean that listeners are paying attention.

As always, the media buying landscape is evolving.  Pay some attention to the advertisements you encounter over the next year or so, including what medium you receive the ad.

So!  What did I miss?  What are you watching in the world of marketing?  Let me know in the comment section.

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