Sunday Roundup – June 8, 2014

Intention. It is the reason why we act – we intend to get a result.

Exactly what the result is, however, is the important part of intention. Intending only to be kind will get the result you want, even if you don’t know you want it.

Treating People with Kindness

Kindness begins with one of two intentions: 1) to receive something in return or 2) for the sake of doing it. Reason 2 is best, as it focuses on one’s own intent.

There is no expectation of return, so there is no chance to be disappointed. Expecting nothing in return makes it more pleasant when one receives something in return anyway.

Pillars of Trust

Business owners will consider Reason 1 first. That is how a business functions: it is intended to generate a profit .

Reason 2 to be kind does not expect return, but that does not mean there will be no return. Being kind with no intention of instant return is more noticeable than one would imagine, and doing so creates stories of trust that are worth sharing.

Clients sharing their own stories about an amazing business works far better than a business telling the same stories. There is no better endorsement than “on top of delivering the goods at the right price, they were exceptionally kind”.

Career Boosters: The Value of Volunteering

“I did it for the sake of itself” is not the best interview content, so the article linked above focuses on direct benefits of volunteering. Though one may volunteer for the sake of doing it, the interviewees make it clear that there are tangible benefits.

Just like being kind, volunteering has more benefits than “more business” or “another sale”. Volunteering is kindness given action – doing good deeds for the sake of doing it. Picking up skills, knowledge, and relationships are side-effects that need no warning label.

Over to You…

Do you give away your time? What about your kindness? Tell a story about the unexpected benefits of your intention to be a good person.

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Sunday Roundup – March 30, 2014

Choices are inevitable. What conversations to join, how to participate after joining, and what work one does to earn a living are decisions that everyone makes.

Let’s jump into this week’s articles.

Have a Purpose and Be Social

A classmate put this post together. To reframe his thoughts: Be strategic about using social media. Without a purpose, the task is aimless. Without an understanding of the medium and how it works, the task is unlikely to succeed.

GM Uses Social Media to manage its Customers and Its Reputation

Speaking of using social media for a specific purpose and being social, General Motors seems to be doing a good job. Social media is immediate and easily watched by many eyes (including employees), meaning that it can be an excellent customer service and crisis management tool

Your Story About Money

I shared this because it says something important about the work we do. The way we make money is connected to that money itself. Good work makes for good money, and good money feels better.

Who’s Responsible?

Seth Godin gets two spots this week, as I think both posts are interrelated. This one is a short piece about personal responsibility and things we can control. For example, how money is earned and what we do with once it is earned are within our control.

Over to You…

What do you think about social media? Making money? Personal responsibility? Leave a comment!

Internal Marketing – The Newsletter

Organizations of all sizes often have some form of “internal marketing”. Product/service training, sell sheets, and newsletters are all examples. Even speeches and presentations by co-workers and supervisors are internal marketing.

All internal marketing is important, but I am going to focus on newsletters.

News Print

Most literature on the subject that I have read (most recently, Public Relations Writing by Bivins, T.H.) tells the same story. Newsletters are a piece of internal communication that mixes “hard” (monthly sales figures, product updates, etc) and “soft” (employee X had a child, look at this picture of your co-workers being silly, etc) news. Hard news delivers important facts while soft news implies what behaviour is acceptable in the office and what kind of values are part of the company’s internal culture.

When I began working at a medium-sized (100-200 employees) company, through nobody’s fault, I did not receive a copy of the company’s internal newsletter for the first month and a half. When I began to receive the newsletter, I noticed that it was easier to interact with co-workers and assess my work.

The Inside Track

Have you ever been conversing with two or more other people when an inside joke between those other people is brought up? I find that alienating, and it is even more so if the conversation diverts to follow the thread of that inside joke.

The same feeling crept up on me while I was not receiving the company’s newsletter. I heard references to specific events and images in the newsletter, and I had no idea what was going on. I felt like a temporary consultant rather than an employee on payroll.

My work was also impacted. Most of my work is writing that must represent the company’s culture. That work was stressful – more so than I had experienced with any writing I have ever done. My stress-level dropped after I received the company newsletter regularly: the bar by which I could assess my writing had been set.

Resolution

Newsletters are a simple and effective way to share news relevant to employees (key word: relevant), and they can also communicate the company’s culture. I think there are other issues in my own situation (I was sick for a couple weeks and my previous supervisor left the company), but I am certain the newsletter had a profound effect on me.

Over to You…

Do you have any experience with newsletters or any other internal marketing? Leave a comment and share your story.

Sunday Roundup – March 2, 2014

I have five stories for you lads and ladies this week. Other than the Harvard Business Review article, most of the articles focus on values – yes, even the article about Comcast.

So, without further adieu; feast your eyes on my Sunday Roundup:

Feminism is having a wardrobe malfunction.

This makes an important point about values that can be applied to individuals or businesses. We all have our own sets of values, and the organizations we operate and/or are employed by have sets of values. No matter how good we think our values are, they are ours alone. We can and do believe any number of things, but none of those things are necessarily the “right way”, they’re just “our way”.

Erika Linder is Him and Her in Mesmerizing Campaign for Crocker Jeans.

Androgyny for the win! Gender, as usual, is irrelevant. First of all, I’m impressed at how well Ms. Linder acts the male part – some of her gender swap is makeup, but some of it appears to be how she moves the muscles in her face.

How does this relate to values? Not all genders are considered equal in North American society, whether that gender is the result of good acting and make up, genetics, or bring transgendered. It is well past time to reconsider the value we place on gender.

Human2Human: Jargon or an Old a that Still Matters?

How much value to we place on being “businesslike”? How much to we place on human interaction and conversation?

Employees, customers, and anyone else directly or indirectly involved in a business are human beings before they chose to involve themselves with a business. Even the C-suite of a company is a human being by birth.

From my perspective as a marketer, it is easier to be human. Having a real, honest conversation with a prospective client is far more engaging than acting like a machine. After all, I was born human, too.

How To Make Yourself Work When You Just Don’t Want To.

I don’t always agree with what comes out of Harvard, but I would not accuse them of being poor workers – they seem to get a lot done. How do they do it? Perhaps they do not use the tips in the following article, but I like to think they do.

Comcast doesn’t give a f*ck.

Of course they don’t. By owning almost all of the cable networks in the United States, they don’t have to care about competition or what customers want. Customers have no choices other than Comcast owned services, so Comcast has no incentive to be anything other than self-serving, and there are no competitors offering better prices or service or anything else that I customer would want from their cable network. So do we value our cable television enough to stand up against Comcast buying cable providers? I do, at least I would if I lived in the United States.

Over to You…

What did you read this week? Did I miss something important? Do you have a question? Leave a comment and tell me about it!

Before We Begin a Witch Hunt…

Hello everyone! My apologies for a late blog: some ducks had to be put in a row for this one to be published. Now, on to defending internships…

In the past 4 months alone, there has been a deluge of news stories exemplifying bad internships. However, unpaid internships are not inherently evil. The circumstances and result of internships, on the other hand, could pass inspection as evil.

For those same 4 months, two days of every week have been booked for what is essentially an internship. It is not called that, but it functions the same way: I do work for a company and am not paid. This arrangement came about because I met with an experienced member of the marketing industry who invited me to learn more about said industry by doing volunteer work at the company where she works.

What Works

This internship works for a few reasons. It takes up only six hours every week, and I can work additional hours if I feel like it or need to so that work is completed. My direct supervisor is acting as a mentor: answering questions, inviting me to participate in tasks, allowing me to make my own mistakes, and providing honest feedback.

The most important part is how much control I had over the arrangement. I was asked to set my hourly commitment. I am expected to be honest if I think that I will be unable to complete a task.

Obviously those tasks benefit the company, but they are also relevant to my career goals. That is enhanced further by the aforementioned face-to-face feedback that flows both ways. The intentional results are refinement of my skills (helping me) that benefits the company (skilled workers are generally do better work) and refinement of current employees’ skills in the organization (see previous parentheses).

Examples of What Does Not Work

I am not stuck in an internship of 12-hour days doing phone surveys on the premise that is “relevant work” for a management position (don’t teach me about quality control charts or how to manage the differences between individual employees – why would I need those as a manager?). I am not bussing tables for free at the Fairmont Waterfront Hotel in Vancouver (I am still reeling at the fact Fairmont is serious).

The Issues

Based on what I have read in the articles above and my own experience, it seems like there are two main problems that make unpaid internships unbearable for interns.

Over-Commitment

Human beings have fundamental needs. Eating, sleeping, drinking water, and having access to shelter and clothes are important for everyday life; so is having time to mentally unwind. No pay, no time to earn money on the side and limited leisure time because of a high number of working hours (and not listening to complaints) has unfortunate results.

Some will argue that the interns have made a choice to work the hours they do. That is true in some cases, and I am sure any intern takes their positions with faith that they will be treated well. Unrealistic time commitment expectations and no chance to have complaints heard does not constitute “well treatment”.

Actual Learning

Six 40-hour weeks performing phone surveys do not qualify as broadening a skill set. One week of phone surveys? That will teach someone a lot about the ground-level work and how to be patient in the face of anger and resentment, so it is not useless. However, an additional five weeks of phone surveys is like using a sledgehammer to drive home a finishing nail.

How about bussing tables at the Fairmont Vancouver for free? What can one learn from that internship? How to stack and carry more plates than looks reasonable and fake a smile.

The Bottom Line

Internships are not inherently evil. Everyone involved in an internship can benefit: interns gain skills, organizations gain trained employees and current employees (if they’re smart/willing to accept criticism) can refine their own skills. Keep internships alive, but make sure they deliver what is promised without pushing a human being past their bodily limits.

No Accounting for Taste

About three weeks ago, an American Apparel ad showed up on one of the news websites that I frequent. It struck me as unusual and tasteless, so I downloaded the image for analysis. I checked American Apparel’s website, and the image seems to be part of a broader marketing campaign.

Bear in mind this is my interpretation; I am biased and know it. So what do you see in the ad? What do you think of American Apparel’s campaign? Take a look and let me know what you think in the comments.

Style, Not Substance

Most of the pictures on American Apparel’s website seem like they were home-shot at night using a very basic camera and flash. Models are primarily home-grown-looking ladies and gentlemen doing their best model impression. I like this style on premise: the images appear “spur-of-the-moment” and I think that will hook a generation of instant-satisfaction and spontaneity.

Many of the photos are past flattering. Poses are sexual and clothing is minimal. There are many shots of ladies in little more than undergarments or mesh fabric, or bra-less with jackets open other than a single collar button, or exposing their breasts in rare cases.

The borderline and over-the-line nudity is not a problem itself and it fits into the overall concept of the photo slideshows – average, everyday ladies caught feeling like posing in their American Apparel clothes – but how young the ladies appear is worrisome.

Symbolism & Sex

Anyway; the ad itself.

American Apparel Advertisement
American Apparel advertisement

A bra-less woman wearing booty shorts that sparkle and a see-through “shirt”, drinking from an equally sparkly water container. Note that the low-production value .gif shows pink liquid flowing from the bottle to her mouth and down her chin. She’s also pulling at the edge of her ludicrously sparkly booty shorts.

I assume the sparkles are designed to catch attention. They tend to do that. The only thing I can think they would symbolize is the “shine” of new clothes.

The sheer shirt is another eye-grabber, though my eyes find the water bottle and shorts first. The tugged waistline and pouring pink fluid are the next-noticed parts of the photo: obvious symbols of sexuality. The rest of the shoot is even more sexual.

The ad does get my attention, so it succeeds in the most basic way. Past that, my first reaction was “What the hell?”

Generally clothing brands promote a lifestyle. Based on this ad and similar images found on American Apparel’s website, the lifestyle of the company target demographic is filled with poor lighting and masquerading as a photographer to collect photos of barely-clothed women.

The Bottom Line

The ad and campaign grab attention with sparkles and symbols of sexuality; nothing more. If anything, it implies that American Apparel clothing looks best on the floor. The message it sends to young ladies and hopeful models is equally hollow: “show skin to succeed”.

I think I would react differently if the sexuality was equal. I am glad the ladies in each ad have work and are comfortable enough to show off, but every male model is fully clothed while most of the females are semi-clothed at best (I found only one set involving a shirtless male after about an hour of searching). I guess the company is trying to be empowering, but just comes across like a white panel van with blacked-out windows parked in front of an all-girl private school.

 

Textbook Reading: It’s Just a Phase…

In my first year at college, a student approached me after class to ask a question.

“How did you remember that one sentence in the assigned chapter that answered the professor’s question, man?”  At the time, my answer was lame (and the irony is that I can’t remember the professors question or my answer):

“I just read the material.”

Though not exciting, that was the correct answer at the time.  I would skim the chapter, and then read it soon after.  Since then, I have refined my textbook reading technique into a phased approach.

It works for me, but it is by no means the “only” way to get through an assigned reading.  At the very least, I hope it will help you create an approach that works best for you.

Phase 1: The Set-Up

Set Aside Time

My usual is 4 hours in a morning for one subject, 4 hours the same afternoon for another subject.  If pressed, I can add additional reading or assignments (or a social life) to the middle of the day or evening.

If you’re taking a course that has a regular schedule, a regulated reading schedule will be helpful.  The routine will make it easier to actually do the reading instead of putting it off until later.  It will also make it easier for your brain to categorize and retain the information.

Grab a glass of water.  Fill a cup of coffee.  Make your lunch.  Whatever makes your study time comfortable and allows you to retain information; do it.

Study Space

I study at my dining table.  Always.

Just like the consistent timing of a study session, the consistent place will help you retain information.  It can also help with the next step.

Remove Distractions

Turn off the cell phone.  Log off Facebook.  Disconnect from the internet.  Lock your front door.  Seriously.

This is the most important step.  Do it right.  You are trying to create knowledge, so focus on that instead of the world around you.

Phase 2: Information Intake

Know What You’re Getting Into

Read the chapter overview.  It’s there for a reason: to tell you what you’re about to read.

Read the End First

Just like an awful novel you don’t feel obligated to read completely.

A well written chapter summary is worth its weight in gold.  It should tell you what you can expect from the chapter and the author’s writing style.

If the summaries in your textbook suck, write a list of the reasons why and discuss them with your professor.  Generally they choose the textbook for the course, so will appreciate the feedback.  If they don’t, then they aren’t much of a professor.

Skim the chapter

Read definitions of key terms.  Highlight sections that grab your attention.  Take a look over charts and graphics.

At this stage, you don’t need to think about the information.  By this point, you should have a general sense of what the chapter is trying to say.  If questions come to mind, write them down and try to answer them in the next phase.

Break

Take a 5 minute break.  Mentally bounce what you just read around in your mind.  There is no need to draw conclusions.

Phase 3: Knowledge Creation

Other than removing distractions, this is the most critical phase.  It will take time.  It may not be easy.  However, it will help you get what you need from the textbook.

Reading

Read the chapter word for word.  Re-read the summary.  Take the time to consider definitions in a way that will help you understand what the term means.

Highlight key concepts.  Think about them, too.  Ask yourself “what does this concept mean in the context of this class and my life?  How can I apply it?”

While reading, take notes based on how you understand what you are reading; you can always check your understanding with your professor.  These will be useful in class and later in life.  The way that you understand the content is more important than how the textbook presents it. Exact format is unimportant: mind maps are effective, but you may find other forms of notes to be more effective.

If there are example exercises, do at least a few of them.  This is especially important for math-heavy classes.  Do the math; it will make your in-class and in-exam life less painful.

Re-read sections that do not make sense.  Take a 5 minute break to consider a section if it still does not make sense.  Write down questions.

Review

Reading needs to be done first; however, review is just as important for retention of information and creating knowledge.

Open the textbook to the appropriate chapter, read over your notes, highlighted concepts, and sections that didn’t quite make sense.  Consider how it could apply to your life or how you assume it applies to the context of the class associated to the textbook.  Think of examples of putting the chapter concepts to use.  Spend at least 10-20 minutes reflecting on the material.

Review in a way that fits the class material.  For dense and complex textbooks like those I read for psychology and consumer behaviour classes, I recommend taking additional time for review.  When I took those classes, I would dedicate the first 4 hour session to reading with some time to review, and then a 2-3 hour block either the next day or later in the same day to review and re-skim the chapter.

Break Away

Organize and collect your notes.  Close the textbook.

You’re done…for now.

Phase 4: Final Review

Re-skim the chapter and your notes the night before or the day of (if you have the time) class.  I know some students that re-read the entire chapter.  Write down any new understandings of the material that come to mind as you revisit it; same for questions.

Bring your knowledge to class.  Answer questions.  Ask questions.  Feel smart.

How do you read your textbooks?  Is there a specific ritual like the one I’ve described?  Tell us about it in ta comment.

Beer, Tweens, Cereal, and Space

Happy (late) Canada day!

Here’s my quick run-down of must-see articles in marketing last week:

How appropriate that this Molson Canadian campaign came up last week.  It’s adorable in a nostalgic-with-beer kinda way.  Not my favourite commercial of the year, but it’s fun reboot of a classic traditional media campaign, so I like it.

Next, here’s some interesting data about Tweens, as compiled and made pretty by these guys.  Or thing.  I’m not 100% certain which monriker is more appropriate.

Great information to have if you are thinking about marketing to Generation Y.  The pie chart about instant gratification made me laugh; it seems that most tweens don’t like delayed satisfaction.

Next up, I present some social media lessons!

General Mills Gets a Firm that Gets Social Media 

Spredfast being the firm in question.  Read the quote below (found here):

“…Aaron Miller, social media and marketing specialist for the CPG firm [states] “One is to set in place brand foundations that enable success in social media. We’ve established that each brand needs a purpose—reasons for being that go beyond selling Cheerios.

-Heine, C, for AdWeek

“…needs a purpose…”

Baseline social media strategy, ladies and gentlemen.  Lay down why your brand/company/not-for-profit/self/dog is on social media.

Think of it this way: “why would a customer want to meet with and engage me on social media?”  Once you have a “why” (and a “where your clients are”), then the “what” becomes easier.

The Take Away

Have a “why” in your social strategy.  Tie it into your overall brand.  Know your audience, and give them what they like.

Social NASA

Oh NASA.  You guys are so good at what you do.  And some of what you do happens to be social media.

I hope everyone remembers @cmdr_hadfield‘s 5-month journey into space.  He posted a bunch of pictures.  Go find ’em if you haven’t already had a look.  Earth is beautiful.

Back to the main point: Real live astronauts and scientists on the social web!  I can remember wishing I had a direct line into NASA and CSA in elementary school, and now you’re telling me it’s possible AND I can see it on my cellphone?!

Excellent.

The Take Away

Most (not all) accounts on social networks are connected to a real person in some way, so those real people want to see things written and posted by real people.  I guarantee that if a scientist at NASA is excited about completing an experiment (and they’re allowed to share it), who better than the real, excited scientist?  I can’t imagine trying to be the PR person trying to fake a “EUREKA!” on Twitter.

Marketing Monday

Happy Monday, everyone!  Last week, I tried an experiment; writing a blog every morning.  It was a great experiment, but I am not convinced that I should continue.  As such, I am trying a twice-a-week schedule: a Monday-morning catch up on news from the Marketing industry and something else on Friday which will likely depend on the events of each week.  Stay tuned!

Onwards!

Instagram Video

Facebook has added video to Instagram.  Yup, it’s happening.  Twitter’s app, Vine, has propelled the other social media giant to create a competitor.

Instagram’s co-founder, Kevin Systrom, may have said it best:

“This is the same Instagram we all know and love but it moves,”

The Instagram feature allows for 15 seconds of video, and includes the filters that Instragram is so well loved for.

I like the upgrade to 15 seconds.  Vine seemed like a cool idea, but 6 seconds is very limiting.  15 is the same length as a short commercial on radio, so marketers and advertisers will be able to adapt quickly.

Details Count  

Mountain Equipment Co-op has changed its logo.  Scary stuff.

Apparently the change is due to a change in customer demographics.  Though there was one comment, by Mountain Man, attached to the story on Marketin Mag’s website that made this point:

From iconic to unremarkable.

Personally, I don’t know how well the change will go over.  The new logo reminds me of GAP’s logo, though the transparent elements of it  could be perceived in a variety of ways.  Only time will tell.

Ogilvy & Mathers Does it Again  

The marketing giant’s New York office has created an equally gigantic campaign for Coca-Cola.  At the least, I must give them points for creativity and ambition.  You’ll see what I mean:

The scope of the campaign is incredible.  I’m impressed that they managed to pull it off.

A Canadian Icon Takes Back Ground  

Canadian Tire sells more than just tires, and they’re more than happy to show it.  Ottawa’s Scotiabank Place is going to become Canadian Tire Centre.

Oh, and Canadian Tire is taking over almost everything at the arena.  Sport Chek will be supplying the hockey team, Mark’s work Warehouse (now just Mark’s) will supply staff clothing, the kitchens will become the company’s personal test kitchen, and even the in-area bar will be rebranded as the Sport Chek Bar & Grill.

All of those subsidiaries are relatively recent acquisitions for the Canadian company.  I have heard that Canadian companies are not aggressive enough in how they do business, at least compared to their American counterparts.  This kind of wide-ranging deal is a strong move for a Canadian company, and hopefully the start of a reversed trend.

Online Ads Pass Traditional Media

Online advertising is taking over the media buying landscape and providing solid profits.  This is no surprise to most of us.  The online environment allows for more targeting, more tracking, and generally better spend ad dollars.

Thought there is one surprise that I touched on last week: radio advertising spend is on the rise, which is likely due to radios ubiquity, low entrance price, and availability of “hot” stations.  By “hot” I mean that listeners are paying attention.

As always, the media buying landscape is evolving.  Pay some attention to the advertisements you encounter over the next year or so, including what medium you receive the ad.

So!  What did I miss?  What are you watching in the world of marketing?  Let me know in the comment section.

Twitter Canada, Traditional Media, and more…

Hello all!  I have decided to add something to this blog: my summary of the morning’s marketing news that comes across my desk.  I will aim to have this published every weekday around noon.

If you have any suggested sources, please forward them to me.  I am always interested in new information.

Onwards!

Twitter Canada Open for Business 

The ubiquitous 140-character text broadcast service had opened its Canadian outpost.  It seems like their focus is on business; the article mentions several tools such as Twitter Amplify and Ad Targeting.

Amplify is video service that sends “real-time” video embedded in a tweet, and the Canadian office managing director says it will be useful for radio broadcasters.  I have no clue how it will manage to be “real-time”, but the concept is interesting.

Ad Targeting Isn’t quite what it sounds like.  It is a method of engaging people who have just watched a traditional television advertisement to create a community around a show or advertisement.

Both tools seem designed to enhance interaction with traditional media.  It is worth noting that the managing director, Kristine Stewart, used to work as the executive vice president of English Services at CBC – in fact she only changed jobs in April.  It is good to see a veteran broadcaster heading services designed to enhance traditional media, especially in an age when radio revenue is stagnant and television profits are plummeting.

Traditions

As just noted, traditional media is suffering.  Marshall McLuhan’s line between hot and cold media is beginning to blur.  The drop in television profit, according to the story linked above, is a decline in advertising sales.  Television has been hot media in the past, but YouTube’s on-demand entertainment is much more convenient than waiting for your favourite show to come on – and there space for advertisement.

Apparently radio advertising sales have increased, despite Canadian radio’s bottom line immobile.  News and newstalk stations are staying profitable because listeners are paying attention (beautiful words to any advertiser).  Ontario radio stations are the most profitable in the country – not surprising if you know what the 401 highway in Toronto is like.  Radio’s lower entry price than television and use as background ambiance in small businesses are also contributing factors to the medium’s continued success.

One interesting side note from the linked radio story: CBC alone employs about the same number of people as private broadcasters CTV, Global Television, City and Quebec’s TVA combined.

Why is Traditional Still Alive?

It isn’t surprising that marketers are sticking with what they know – and what is simple.  This infographic says it right: trying to keep up with the data provided by social media is like “trying to drink from a fire hose”.  Personally, I like my water in glasses; it’s much more manageable.

Media like radio are much easier to define.  A station will broadcast specific content that will (with some exceptions) attract a specific audience.  Television is the same.  When it comes to awareness campaigns based on advertising, a reliable audience is key.

However, that doesn’t mean that all new/digital media are hard to use.  Google has been busy beating the hell out of other advertisers when it comes to mobile ads.  That isn’t surprising: Google’s simple but effective keyword based advertising platform combined with their integrated services (Gmail, YouTube, search, etc) makes it easy to get the right message to the right person.

So…Why Should I Care?

Media literacy.  Having a perspective on the media landscape is important so that you – the consumer of media or a business owner using media – can make decisions about what is right for you.  Whether you are watching or creating the commercial, a little knowledge can go a long way.

Great Reads

What is the most important job skill of the future?  The ability to interact face-to-face.  

The press is tired of bad press releases.  Give them a break and get the coverage you want by reading (and memorizing) this style guide.

Foxy Foxy

I’ll leave you with an introduction to the head of Twitter Canada.  Other than working for one of my favourite broadcast companies (support public broadcasting!), the managing director is also a foxy lady.

kristine stewart Twitter canada managing director
Gaze into the eyes of Twitter Canada…

The Wrap

Did I miss something?  Is my sentence structure awful?  Send me an email: russell@rggraham.me.